Utorrent

µTorrent (or uTorrent and commonly abbreviated as “µT” or “uT“) is a freeware,closed source BitTorrent client by BitTorrent, Inc

The program has been in active development since its first release in 2005. Although originally developed by Ludvig Strigeus, since December 7, 2006 the code is owned and maintained by BitTorrent, Inc.[14] The code has also been employed by BitTorrent, Inc. as the basis for version 6.0 of the BitTorrent client, a re-branded version of µTorrent.

About box easter eggs

  • If the user opens the About screen (“Help” > “About µTorrent”) and then presses the “T” key, it will start a built-in Tetris game called µTris.[34]
  • Clicking the µTorrent logo in the About screen will play a synthesized sound similar to Deep Note.[34

There are many terms related to torrent.

Some very popular words are seeds,peers,leechs,client etc.

Client

The program that enables p2p file sharing via the BitTorrent protocol. Examples of clients include µTorrent and Vuze.

Hash

The hash is a string of alphanumeric characters in the .torrent file that the client uses to verify the data that is being transferred. It contains information like the file list, sizes, pieces, etc. Every piece received is first checked against the hash. If it fails verification, the data is discarded and requested again. The ‘Hash Fails’ field in the torrent’s General tab shows the number of these hash fails.
Hash checks greatly reduce the chance that invalid data is incorrectly identified as valid by the BitTorrent client, but it is still possible for invalid data to have the same hash value as the valid data and be treated as such. This is known as a hash collision.

Health

Health is shown in a bar or in % usually next to the torrents name and size, on the site where the .torrent file is hosted. It shows if all pieces of the torrent are available to download (i.e. 50% means that only half of the torrent is available).

Leech

leech is a term with two meanings. Usually it is used to refer a peer who has a negative effect on the swarm by having a very poor share ratio (downloading much more than they upload). Most leeches are users on asymmetric internet connections and do not leave their BitTorrent client open to seed the file after their download has completed. However, some leeches intentionally avoid uploading by using modified clients or excessively limiting their upload speed.

Peer

peer is one instance of a BitTorrent client running on a computer on the Internet to which other clients connect and transfer data. Usually a peer does not have the complete file, but only parts of it. However, in the colloquial definition, “peer” can be used to refer to any participant in the swarm (in this case, it’s synonymous with “client”).

Seeder

seeder is a peer that has an entire copy of the torrent and offers it for upload. The more seeders there are, the better the chances of getting a higher download speed. If the seeder seeds the whole copy of the download, they should get faster downloads.

Share ratio

A user’s share ratio for any individual torrent is a number determined by dividing the amount of data that user has uploaded by the amount of data they have downloaded. Final share ratios over 1 carry a positive connotation in the BitTorrent community, because they indicate that the user has sent more data to other users than they received. Likewise, share ratios under 1 have negative connotation.

Torrent

torrent can mean either a .torrent metadata file or all files described by it, depending on context. The torrent file contains metadata about all the files it makes downloadable, including their names and sizes and checksums of all pieces in the torrent. It also contains the address of a tracker that coordinates communication between the peers in the swarm.

If you want utorrent 2.2 go to http://www.utorrent.com and download it.Its as easy as abc

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